Goodreads Tag

I’ve been trying to be a bit more active on Goodreads lately, so I thought I’d do the Goodreads book tag.

  • What was the last book you marked as read?

The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke, which the first book in a duology. It’s a YA fantasy book featuring pirates and magical assassins.

  • What are you currently reading?

The Pirate’s Wish by Cassandra Rose Clarke, the second book in the duology mentioned in my previous answer!

  • What was the last book you marked as TBR?

I don’t really use Goodreads to record my TBR list, I just add the book when I start to read it. But I am considering starting to keep a TBR list and wishlist on Goodreads.

  • What book do you plan to read next?

Well I have a few fantasy series to choose from, but I think I may read an SF novel before jumping into any of those. I’m not sure, I’ll have to see how I feel when I finish the current novel I’m reading.

  • Do you use the star rating system?

Yes. The rating scale I use is an entirely subjective one, where a rating of five stars indicates a book that I loved, four stars a book that I really liked, three stars a book that I mostly enjoyed, two stars a book that I didn’t like and one reserved for books that I truly loathed. Most of the ratings are skewed towards the positive end, as I tend not to finish books that I really disliked, and I don’t rate those ones, I just abandon them. I think I am quite generous with my star ratings overall, a lot of books end up in the 4 or 5 star categories.

  • Are you doing a 2014 Reading Challenge?

I’ve posted about this before, my current goal for the challenge is 150 books, up from 75 at the start of the year.

  • Do you have a wishlist?

I have a wishlist on Amazon where I keep track of the books I want to buy. As I said above regarding the TBR list, I am thinking of incorporating this into Goodreads so I can track everything in one place, and also easily see reviews from people whose opinions I trust or respect.

  • What book do you plan to buy next?

Well having bought this lot, I am restraining myself for the next month or so. That being said there are a few new releasing coming up in the next two months which I will be buying as soon as they are published, including Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie, and The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss.

  • Do you have any favourite quotes, would you like to share a few?

I’m not really someone who collects quotes, and I don’t have any on Goodreads, but I have a quote tag here on Tumblr so you can see any quotes I’ve posted or reblogged.

  • Who are your favourite authors?

At the moment, Iain Banks, Neil Gaiman, Brandon Sanderson, Kurt Vonnegut… I could go on but I’ll leave it there.

  • Have you joined any groups?

Recently I have joined a couple of groups, but I haven’t really been active in any of them yet. It’s something I’m interested in getting involved it, so I’ll try it out at some point.

  • Are there any questions/comments you would like to add?

Personally, I prefer LibraryThing as a way of keeping track of my books, it has a better catalogue system. However it doesn’t have quite the same social component to it that Goodreads has, which it why I am trying to be more active on Goodreads. If you use Goodreads please feel free to add me as a friend.

My book haul from this weekend. What can I say? When I read trilogies or series, I like to do so without taking a break between books, I prefer to get immersed in the world and the story and the characters. I was in the mood for reading some big fantasy trilogies. I had an Amazon gift voucher, and you can figure out what happened next. Hopefully these books will all be good ones, and I am looking forward to all of them. I have a few other unread books to get through, mostly SF novels which I hope to read this month, so now I won’t be buying any more books for quite awhile!

My book haul from this weekend. What can I say? When I read trilogies or series, I like to do so without taking a break between books, I prefer to get immersed in the world and the story and the characters. I was in the mood for reading some big fantasy trilogies. I had an Amazon gift voucher, and you can figure out what happened next. Hopefully these books will all be good ones, and I am looking forward to all of them. I have a few other unread books to get through, mostly SF novels which I hope to read this month, so now I won’t be buying any more books for quite awhile!

I started off the month by reading Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes. I’m reading this for my book group, but it is a book I’ve read several times before. I first read it in school, and later I read this copy when I was working my way through the SF Masterworks series, so I had last read it about 10 years ago. Nonetheless it was a book that had stuck in my mind, and I was keen to reread it and I am looking forward to discussing it at my book group.
The book is told through “progress reports” written by the protagonist Charlie Gordon. At the start of the book Charlie can barely read or write, and he has a low IQ. He is taking part in an experiment to increase his intelligence, which had previously only been tested on mice, such as the titular mouse Algernon. The experiment works and Charlie grows rapidly more intelligent, although he struggles emotionally to adjust to this. However soon it becomes clear that Algernon is regressing, and Charlie must face the fact that he too will lose his new found intelligence.
The book is not quite perfect. The main negative is that the language and some of the attitudes are very dated. There is some occasional racist language, but particularly the language and attitudes used to describe people with learning disabilities, which can be rather grating to a contemporary reader. I also thought that the book focuses too much on the sexual elements of Charlie’s development, which is something I do not remember from earlier readings of the book.
But those issues aside, I really love this book, it is an incredibly well told, touching and thought-provoking story. It’s a short book, just over 200 pages, and I read the whole thing in one sitting, I was just utterly engrossed by it. I would really recommend the book, it’s a very good read.

I started off the month by reading Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes. I’m reading this for my book group, but it is a book I’ve read several times before. I first read it in school, and later I read this copy when I was working my way through the SF Masterworks series, so I had last read it about 10 years ago. Nonetheless it was a book that had stuck in my mind, and I was keen to reread it and I am looking forward to discussing it at my book group.

The book is told through “progress reports” written by the protagonist Charlie Gordon. At the start of the book Charlie can barely read or write, and he has a low IQ. He is taking part in an experiment to increase his intelligence, which had previously only been tested on mice, such as the titular mouse Algernon. The experiment works and Charlie grows rapidly more intelligent, although he struggles emotionally to adjust to this. However soon it becomes clear that Algernon is regressing, and Charlie must face the fact that he too will lose his new found intelligence.

The book is not quite perfect. The main negative is that the language and some of the attitudes are very dated. There is some occasional racist language, but particularly the language and attitudes used to describe people with learning disabilities, which can be rather grating to a contemporary reader. I also thought that the book focuses too much on the sexual elements of Charlie’s development, which is something I do not remember from earlier readings of the book.

But those issues aside, I really love this book, it is an incredibly well told, touching and thought-provoking story. It’s a short book, just over 200 pages, and I read the whole thing in one sitting, I was just utterly engrossed by it. I would really recommend the book, it’s a very good read.

This is the penultimate book in my Iain Banks rereading project, Transition. This is a strange one, as it is clearly an SF book, but it is published with Iain Banks as the author, as opposed to Iain M. Banks. I can only assume this is because it is the sort of SF that doesn’t involve spaceships and aliens, and therefore doesn’t quite fit with his normal space opera SF novels. The book follows several different characters who are connected to an organisation called the Concern, which involves the transitioning between parallel worlds. There is a schism in the Concern and the book follows different characters from each side of this civil war. I liked the book, it is full of interesting ideas and wonderful, unreliable, twisted characters. It’s not my favourite of Banks’ books, but it fills a nice gap between his mainstream fiction and his harder SF novels, and for that reason I really like it and that’s why I included it in this project.

This is the penultimate book in my Iain Banks rereading project, Transition. This is a strange one, as it is clearly an SF book, but it is published with Iain Banks as the author, as opposed to Iain M. Banks. I can only assume this is because it is the sort of SF that doesn’t involve spaceships and aliens, and therefore doesn’t quite fit with his normal space opera SF novels. The book follows several different characters who are connected to an organisation called the Concern, which involves the transitioning between parallel worlds. There is a schism in the Concern and the book follows different characters from each side of this civil war. I liked the book, it is full of interesting ideas and wonderful, unreliable, twisted characters. It’s not my favourite of Banks’ books, but it fills a nice gap between his mainstream fiction and his harder SF novels, and for that reason I really like it and that’s why I included it in this project.

Books Read in August 2014
The Way of Shadows – Brent Weeks
Right Ho, Jeeves – PG Wodehouse
Leviathan Wakes – James S.A. Corey
Caliban’s War – James S.A. Corey
Abaddon’s Gate – James S.A. Corey
Cibola Burn – James S.A. Corey
The Best of All Possible Worlds – Karen Lord
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage – Haruki Murakami
We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves – Karen Joy Fowler
The Alloy of Law – Brandon Sanderson
Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
Replay – Ken Grimwood
The Thief – Megan Whalen Turner
Transition – Iain Banks
This month got off to a bad start, but picked up from there, and I ended up reading 14 books in August.
The two highlights were definitely the Expanse series by James S.A. Corey and The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson.
I also enjoyed the newest Haruki Murkami novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, which I read just before I saw Murakami speaking at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, a great experience.
I’m not sure exactly what I’ll be reading next month, as I am never very good at sticking to any TBR plans that I make. I have an SF novel to start off with, which I am reading for my book group. But otherwise I am feeling in a fantasy mood so I think I will also be reading a few fantasy novels or series in September too.

Books Read in August 2014

  • The Way of Shadows – Brent Weeks
  • Right Ho, Jeeves – PG Wodehouse
  • Leviathan Wakes – James S.A. Corey
  • Caliban’s War – James S.A. Corey
  • Abaddon’s Gate – James S.A. Corey
  • Cibola Burn – James S.A. Corey
  • The Best of All Possible Worlds – Karen Lord
  • Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage – Haruki Murakami
  • We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves – Karen Joy Fowler
  • The Alloy of Law – Brandon Sanderson
  • Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
  • Replay – Ken Grimwood
  • The Thief – Megan Whalen Turner
  • Transition – Iain Banks

This month got off to a bad start, but picked up from there, and I ended up reading 14 books in August.

The two highlights were definitely the Expanse series by James S.A. Corey and The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson.

I also enjoyed the newest Haruki Murkami novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, which I read just before I saw Murakami speaking at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, a great experience.

I’m not sure exactly what I’ll be reading next month, as I am never very good at sticking to any TBR plans that I make. I have an SF novel to start off with, which I am reading for my book group. But otherwise I am feeling in a fantasy mood so I think I will also be reading a few fantasy novels or series in September too.

'The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room.' - Matilda by Roald Dahl

Reader’s Block

Hmm, I have started and then abandoned several books over the past few days. There is nothing wrong with the books in particular, it’s just that nothing seems to appeal to me at the moment. Maybe I could reread the Harry Potter series or the Mistborn trilogy or something like that, something familiar that I can just immerse myself in. I guess it’s just one of those weird reading moods I occasionally get, but frustrating nonetheless.

I realised I hadn’t posted about Doctor Who yet. So here is a brief summary of my thoughts on the new series and the new Doctor. Firstly, I really liked Peter Capaldi. I think it was a promising start and I am interested to see where they take things with this new Doctor. That being said, the story itself was not great, it was alright and it had a few good touches, but I was still a bit underwhelmed. I also continue to dislike Clara, who has proven to be a very uninspiring companion as far as I am concerned. Apparently she may be leaving after this series, which I think would be a good move. Overall though I thought it was not too bad an episode, and I am certainly looking forward to the rest of the series.

I realised I hadn’t posted about Doctor Who yet. So here is a brief summary of my thoughts on the new series and the new Doctor. Firstly, I really liked Peter Capaldi. I think it was a promising start and I am interested to see where they take things with this new Doctor. That being said, the story itself was not great, it was alright and it had a few good touches, but I was still a bit underwhelmed. I also continue to dislike Clara, who has proven to be a very uninspiring companion as far as I am concerned. Apparently she may be leaving after this series, which I think would be a good move. Overall though I thought it was not too bad an episode, and I am certainly looking forward to the rest of the series.

Today I read Replay by Ken Grimwood. This is a fantasy novel about a man, Jeff, who dies in his 40s of a heart attack and wakes up in his college dorm room with the chance to relive his life. He uses his knowledge of the future to make a lot of money betting on sports and playing the stockmarket, and lives a very different life the second time around. Then he dies again, on the same day as previously, and once again wakes up to find himself 20 years in the past. The book follows him as he “replays” his life over and over again.

I had read this book before, back in 2006 according to my records, and I loved it at the time. It’s been on my list of things to reread for awhile now, and I was finally prompted to do so when my friend Michael talked about the book in a recent video that he made (no link as it is unlisted I believe) which reminded me of how much I had liked the book.

Reading it this time around, it was as good as I remembered, and I really enjoyed it. It is such an interesting concept, you can’t help but wonder what you would do in a similar situation. The book really does a great job of exploring and joy and sorrow that it offers Jeff, and the isolation it places him in, and the moral dilemmas it throws up for him too. It is really fascinating and a very enjoyable book to read.

Would You Rather Book Tag

Inspired by this video and this video among others.

Read only trilogies or standalones?

A lot of fantasy and SF is in the form of trilogies or series, so I guess I’d have to go with that. Not that there aren’t great standalone novels though. It’s a though choice.

Read only female or male authors?

Sadly I think I’d have to go for male authors, just because so many of my favourite authors are male, as are so many SF and fantasy authors in general. It’s a disappointment though.

Shop at Barnes & Noble or Amazon?

Well we don’t have Barnes and Noble in the UK, so I am going to substitute Waterstones, which is the only big UK chain book shop. And I’d go for Waterstones, because I like being able to go into the shop and browse for books and pick things up immediately. Plus you can order books from their website and have them delivered to the shop, so even if they don’t have it in stock, it’s not like Amazon is the only alternative. I have been trying to use Amazon less anyway, and buy more books from Waterstones, and it has been working out well for me so far. But it does help that the shop is very convenient for me to get to, it would be different if I lived in the middle of nowhere.

All books become movies or TV shows?

This is a more difficult one. I prefer watching television shows to movies, so I would probably pick that. Plus there are lots of great SF and fantasy series I can think of which would make great television series, but would need to be cut down too much to make movies. So assuming the television show stayed true to the books, I think that would be best.

Read 5 pages per day or 5 books per week?

Five books per week. How is that even a difficult choice? To be honest this week I’ve already read four books, so it’s also not a particularly unrealistic goal either.

Be a professional reviewer or author?

Definitely a professional reviewer. I am not particularly creative and I am not interested in being an author. But I love writing and talking about books. I am not very good at that, mind you, but being paid to read and review books would be a dream job.

Only read your top 20 favourite books over and over or always read new ones that you haven’t read before?

This is such a tough choice. I like rereading books so I would definitely miss not being able to reread old favourites, but 20 books just isn’t enough, so I would have to go for new books instead.

Be a librarian or book seller?

I would pick book seller. My other dream job is working in a science fiction and fantasy specialist book shop.

Only read your favourite genre, or every genre except your favourite?

Do fantasy and science fiction count as one genre? I should think so, since they are shelved together in most bookshops. In that case, yes I would quite happily read only SF and Fantasy books.

Only read physical books or eBooks?

Well I have a Kindle and I do read eBooks, but if it were only one or the other then I would pick physical print books. I don’t have anything against eBooks, but that would be my preference.

Yesterday I read Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein. This is a YA novel set during WWII about two young British women who have ended up in occupied France. The story is told through their writings as one is a captured spy who is forced to write a confession for the Nazis, and the other is a pilot who is keeping a record of her escape from a plane crash and hiding out with the resistance. 
I bought the book after seeing various positive reviews on Booktube and other places, but I was a bit apprehensive about starting it, I wasn’t sure if it would be entirely my sort of thing. However I ended up really, really liking this book, it was far better than I was expecting. I really liked the story and the characters, and the way that the story was told through their writing, and all the various deceptions and plot twists. It was all fantastic, and I would highly recommend this book, it definitely lived up to all the positive reviews.

Yesterday I read Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein. This is a YA novel set during WWII about two young British women who have ended up in occupied France. The story is told through their writings as one is a captured spy who is forced to write a confession for the Nazis, and the other is a pilot who is keeping a record of her escape from a plane crash and hiding out with the resistance. 

I bought the book after seeing various positive reviews on Booktube and other places, but I was a bit apprehensive about starting it, I wasn’t sure if it would be entirely my sort of thing. However I ended up really, really liking this book, it was far better than I was expecting. I really liked the story and the characters, and the way that the story was told through their writing, and all the various deceptions and plot twists. It was all fantastic, and I would highly recommend this book, it definitely lived up to all the positive reviews.

I’ve just finished The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson. I’ve read a lot of Brandon Sanderson books over the past year or so, and he has become one of my favourite fantasy authors. He creates really interesting settings and magic systems, but he also has great characters and plots too. I just really love his books.
My favourite of his novels that I’ve read so far is the Mistborn trilogy, which was also the first thing I read by him. This book is a sequel of sorts to that series. It’s the first book in a new trilogy, set in the same world, but around 300 years after the events of the first trilogy. There is still the same magic systems of Allomancy and Feruchemy, but the technology has advanced and there are now also guns and railways and skyscrapers.
The main character is Wax, who is a noble but has spent the past 20 years living the the Roughs, working as a lawkeeper. It has a very Western feel to it, which is a nice combination to go with the magic. Wax is called back to the city to fulfil his role as heir to his noble house. However he has a hard time putting his past behind him, especially when a gang known as the Vanishers start robbing trains and kidnapping Allomancers.
I absolutely loved this book. It has all of the usual features of Sanderson’s writing that I enjoy. As I said above, he always seems to have the perfect combination of worldbuilding and character development and a good plot. I liked the setting here, an expansion of the Mistborn world, but with a new twist, which worked really well. I loved the characters, Wax and Wayne and Marasi were all superb. The story was a nice mystery-adventure, it was a really enjoyable read. 
If you’ve read the Mistborn trilogy and you want more then I would definitely recommend this book. I am very much looking forward to the continuation of the series, I believe the second book in the trilogy is due out later this year or early next year, so hopefully there will not be too long to wait. If you haven’t read anything by Brandon Sanderson, then I would really recommend the Mistborn trilogy as a good starting point, with this book as an excellent follow up to that.

I’ve just finished The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson. I’ve read a lot of Brandon Sanderson books over the past year or so, and he has become one of my favourite fantasy authors. He creates really interesting settings and magic systems, but he also has great characters and plots too. I just really love his books.

My favourite of his novels that I’ve read so far is the Mistborn trilogy, which was also the first thing I read by him. This book is a sequel of sorts to that series. It’s the first book in a new trilogy, set in the same world, but around 300 years after the events of the first trilogy. There is still the same magic systems of Allomancy and Feruchemy, but the technology has advanced and there are now also guns and railways and skyscrapers.

The main character is Wax, who is a noble but has spent the past 20 years living the the Roughs, working as a lawkeeper. It has a very Western feel to it, which is a nice combination to go with the magic. Wax is called back to the city to fulfil his role as heir to his noble house. However he has a hard time putting his past behind him, especially when a gang known as the Vanishers start robbing trains and kidnapping Allomancers.

I absolutely loved this book. It has all of the usual features of Sanderson’s writing that I enjoy. As I said above, he always seems to have the perfect combination of worldbuilding and character development and a good plot. I liked the setting here, an expansion of the Mistborn world, but with a new twist, which worked really well. I loved the characters, Wax and Wayne and Marasi were all superb. The story was a nice mystery-adventure, it was a really enjoyable read.

If you’ve read the Mistborn trilogy and you want more then I would definitely recommend this book. I am very much looking forward to the continuation of the series, I believe the second book in the trilogy is due out later this year or early next year, so hopefully there will not be too long to wait. If you haven’t read anything by Brandon Sanderson, then I would really recommend the Mistborn trilogy as a good starting point, with this book as an excellent follow up to that.

Great Scott! I was having a bad week so my boyfriend bought me this amazing Back to the Future Lego kit.

At the start of the year I set my goal for the Goodreads Reading Challenge as 75 books. That seems like a good target based on the last couple of years. In 2012 I had a terrible year and only read 55 books, while in 2013 I had a terrific year and read 100 books, my highest yearly total since I starting keeping records back in 2005.

Back in May I hit 50 books and so decided to increase my goal to 100 books. As you can see above, I’m now almost there. I have been reading a great deal over the past year, for a number of reasons, but even so this is pretty surprising. But I love reading and I spend a lot of time reading, so I guess this is just a reflection of that.

I’m not obsessed with numbers, but I do want to increase my reading challenge goal to reflect the amount of reading I’ve been doing. A quick calculation shows that at my current rate, I’m on track for almost 150 books this year. Frankly, that is pretty unbelievable! I don’t exactly need any encouragement to read more, however I am going to increase my goal to 150 books and see what happens.

I’ve just finished We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler. This was a book I was recommended by various people on Tumblr and Booktube and Goodreads. Everyone said it was one of those books with a cool plot twist and it was better to read it without too many preconceptions. I guess I’d agree with that, so I won’t say too much about the plot. The narrator is Rosemary, who tells the story of her sister Fern. It’s an interesting book, and I enjoyed reading it. I certainly didn’t anticipate the plot twist, it was very well done. I liked the book, but at the same time I wasn’t overwhelmed by it, it was just alright. Sorry I don’t have much else to say about it.

I’ve just finished We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler. This was a book I was recommended by various people on Tumblr and Booktube and Goodreads. Everyone said it was one of those books with a cool plot twist and it was better to read it without too many preconceptions. I guess I’d agree with that, so I won’t say too much about the plot. The narrator is Rosemary, who tells the story of her sister Fern. It’s an interesting book, and I enjoyed reading it. I certainly didn’t anticipate the plot twist, it was very well done. I liked the book, but at the same time I wasn’t overwhelmed by it, it was just alright. Sorry I don’t have much else to say about it.