I finally finished a book I’ve been reading off-and-on for the past month, number9dream by David Mitchell. The book is narrated by Eiji Miyake, a 19 year old who has come to Tokyo from his home in rural Japan in order to track down his father. The book follows his quest to find the man, with reality interspersed with fantasy, memory and history.
I have mixed feelings towards the book. It took me awhile to get into it, as evidenced by the fact that it took me almost a month to finish it. There were sections that really dragged and I had to struggle through, but then there were other sections that I really liked and went through quite quickly. Overall I’d say I enjoyed it, and there were some interesting bits and pieces (I really, really liked the sections about the kaiten project for example), but at the same time it didn’t really capture my attention.
Nonetheless, this the the third of Mitchell’s novels I’ve read now, and while I’ve had mixed responses to all of them, I will probably pick up another one at some point, because while I don’t necessarily like everything he does, he is at least an interesting writer.
(Sorry for the rubbish review, I’m rather out of practice with writing these things!)

I finally finished a book I’ve been reading off-and-on for the past month, number9dream by David Mitchell. The book is narrated by Eiji Miyake, a 19 year old who has come to Tokyo from his home in rural Japan in order to track down his father. The book follows his quest to find the man, with reality interspersed with fantasy, memory and history.

I have mixed feelings towards the book. It took me awhile to get into it, as evidenced by the fact that it took me almost a month to finish it. There were sections that really dragged and I had to struggle through, but then there were other sections that I really liked and went through quite quickly. Overall I’d say I enjoyed it, and there were some interesting bits and pieces (I really, really liked the sections about the kaiten project for example), but at the same time it didn’t really capture my attention.

Nonetheless, this the the third of Mitchell’s novels I’ve read now, and while I’ve had mixed responses to all of them, I will probably pick up another one at some point, because while I don’t necessarily like everything he does, he is at least an interesting writer.

(Sorry for the rubbish review, I’m rather out of practice with writing these things!)